Tuesday, September 30, 2014

Will Drinking From A Straw Protect Your Teeth?

Will Drinking From A Straw Protect Your Teeth?


In a word, YES! Sipping drinks through a straw can certainly provide an additional layer of protection for our teeth and gums. Especially when we take to sloshing down some sugary slurry or acidic alcohol, straws can help prevent the cavity creeps from making holes in our teeth and even limit staining or discoloration.

Straws Can Prevent Stained Teeth & Help Limit Exposure to Some Causes of Tooth Decay

Acidic beverages like coffee, fruit juice, and red wine can stain our teeth – especially with regular indulgence. Things can then go from not so shiny white smile bad to what the double hockey sticks happened to make my teeth this color worse! if we also manage to skip out on our thrice annual dental cleaning. But in all seriousness, there are basically three reason why using a straw can protect our teeth while downing our favorite drinks.

Avoid Stained Teeth By Using A Straw This one goes without saying.

We’ve all seen someone (or experienced it ourselves) that may have indulged a little too much on the red wine – and we’re not talking about slurred speech, a splitting headache, or a wobbly walk. You know, that crimson colored hue our once whitish smile takes on whence we indulge a little bit too much in some primo vino. Avoid the dreaded red wine smile, use a straw instead!

Protect Against Tooth Decay By Using A Straw

For those of us that choose to swig some soda from time to time, using a straw can significantly limit the decay causing exposure our teeth receive when we’re constantly swigging and swishing that most cavity causing cola or sugary soft drink – diet or not.
Usually when we take a sip (or gulp) of something whether its out of a can, bottle, or glass, we tend to allow the liquid to linger in our mouths before swallowing. If we bathe our teeth in sugary slurry on the regular we’re just inviting those cavity creeps to come a calling.
But by using a straw to sip sodas, sports drinks, iced coffee, fruit juices, or energy drinks, we can at least take some preventative measures to limit our exposure to decay causing properties.

Got Sensitive Teeth? Use A Straw

Straws can also help reduce those jabs of sensitivity caused by cold or hot drinks. Get into the habit of positioning straws at the back of your mouth so that drinks have minimal exposure to teeth. You can further reduce harmful effects by:
  • NOT swishing beverages around in your mouth.
  • NOT continuously sipping on harmful drinks throughout the day.
  • Following your drinks up with water, sugarless gum, or celery.

So the next time you find yourself slugging down some acidic libation or a super sugary syrupy slurry…sip it through a straw instead!


Our team looks forward to meeting with you and developing a plan tailored to meet your individual needs. You can make an appointment by calling our friendly staff at (305) 670-5100 or by visiting http://www.miamismile.net. Please call Miami Smile Dental if you have any questions about cosmetic dentistry, dental implants, teeth whitening, veneers, wisdom teeth, braces, or general dentistry. We would love to hear from you.

Sunday, September 21, 2014

Baby Bottle Tooth Decay

Baby Bottle Tooth Decay


Even though they are temporary, your child's baby teeth are important, and are still susceptible to cavities. Tooth decay in infants and toddlers is often referred to as Baby Bottle Tooth Decay, or Early Childhood Caries. Children need strong, healthy teeth to chew their food, speak and have a good-looking smile. Their first teeth also help make sure their adult teeth come in correctly. It’s important to start infants off with good oral care to help protect their teeth for decades to come.

What causes Baby Bottle Tooth Decay?

Baby Bottle Tooth Decay most often occurs in the upper front teeth, but other teeth may also be affected.
There are many factors which can cause tooth decay. One common cause is the frequent, prolonged exposure of the baby’s teeth to drinks that contain sugar. Tooth decay can occur when the baby is put to bed with a bottle, or when a bottle is used as a pacifier for a fussy baby.
Tooth decay is a disease that can begin with cavity-causing bacteria being passed from the mother (or primary caregiver) to the infant. These bacteria are passed through the saliva. When the mother puts the baby’s feeding spoon in her mouth, or cleans a pacifier in her mouth, the bacteria can be passed to the baby.
If your infant or toddler does not receive an adequate amount of fluoride, they may also have an increased risk for tooth decay. The good news is that decay is preventable.

Preventing Baby Bottle Tooth Decay

  • Try not to share saliva with the baby through common use of feeding spoons or licking pacifiers. After each feeding, wipe your child’s gums with a clean, damp gauze pad or washcloth.
  • When your child’s teeth come in, brush them gently with a child-size toothbrush and a smear (or grain of rice sized amount) of fluoride toothpaste until the age of 3. 
  • Brush the teeth with a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste from the ages of 3 to 6.
  • Supervise brushing until your child can be counted on to spit and not swallow toothpaste—usually not before he or she is 6 or 7.
  • Place only formula, milk or breastmilk in bottles. Avoid filling the bottle with liquids such as sugar water, juice or soft drinks.
  • Infants should finish their bedtime and naptime bottles before going to bed.
  • If your child uses a pacifier, provide one that is clean—don’t dip it in sugar or honey.
  • Encourage your child to drink from a cup by his/her first birthday.
  • Encourage healthy eating habits.
When your child’s first tooth appears, talk to your dentist about scheduling the first dental visit. Treat the first dental visit as you would a well-baby checkup with the child’s physician. Remember: starting early is the key to a lifetime of good dental health.


Our team looks forward to meeting with you and developing a plan tailored to meet your individual needs. You can make an appointment by calling our friendly staff at (305) 670-5100 or by visiting http://www.miamismile.net. Please call Miami Smile Dental if you have any questions about cosmetic dentistry, dental implants, teeth whitening, veneers, wisdom teeth, braces, or general dentistry. We would love to hear from you.